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What is a UK Concessionary Passport? How to Qualify for One?

In May 2004, the Home Office announced the plan to introduce a scheme of granting free concessionary passports to all the British citizens born on or before 2 September 1929. This new announcement was an extension of the free one-year passports that were issued to the World War 2 veterans who wanted to attend the 60th Anniversary Commemorative Events in 2004 and 2005.

Under the concessionary passport scheme, every British citizen born on or before 1929 is eligible for a free-of-cost 10-year British passport. If you or any of your known relatives want to know about this scheme and apply for it, then contact the best lawyers in London at Osbourne Pinner. We offer expert legal service and help you step-by-step to obtain the concessionary passport after determining your eligibility.


Who is Eligible?


In order to qualify for the concessionary passport, the applicant must in any form be a citizen of Britain at the time of applying for the passport. The said applicant must have been born on or before 2 September 1929. For the purpose of this application and other related legal services, a British national is deemed to be: a British citizen, British national (overseas), British Overseas Territories citizen, British protected person, British overseas citizen, and British subject.


Also, the applicants who have received British citizenship on account of citizenship by naturalisation or registration and meet the above-mentioned age requirement will qualify for the concessionary passport irrespective of the date on which they received their citizenship. If you are confused about the requirements and looking to apply, then Osbourne Pinner’s lawyers in London will help you to get through the application process hassle-free.


Examination of the Applications


A normal examination procedure will be followed to determine the eligibility and identity. The applicants must submit a fully completed form with all the necessary documents for the purpose of examination. Home Office will verify the following information before issuing the concessionary passport:


  • Nationality
  • Entitlement for a concessionary passport
  • Identity
  • Eligibility

If you want to submit a thorough application and need advice and guidance, then get in touch with passport lawyers in London to help you out with the process.


Types of Concessionary Passports


There are two types of concessionary passports, namely:


  • Passports with a validity of one year which was issued in 2004 to former veterans, their spouses, and caretakers.
  • The Passports with ten years of validity issued to British citizens born on or before 2 September 1929.

How to Apply for the Concessionary Passports?


Those who are eligible for this scheme will have to apply for standard passports. Jumbo passports are not issued under this category and will be available on full fee payment. Applications can be sent through the Post, the partners Check & Send service. You can also apply through appointments at the regional office counters. These passports are issued free of cost to those who meet the eligibility criteria. The charge is waived for standard passports delivered through the normal route, and any additional services would invite the required charges.


Get Expert Legal Services at Osbourne Pinner


Our team of the best lawyers in London has extensive experience helping the clients present complete and thorough passport applications along with all the important documentation and evidence. If you are looking to understand the rules surrounding passports and inquire about the visa services, contact Osbourne Pinner. We are among the best law firms in London and specialise in British passport applications. We also offer reliable and practical immigration counselling, ensuring that you do not falter with immigration rules and regulations. All the legal services provided by us are affordable, and our team of lawyers is approachable to every person, whether a citizen of the UK or not.

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